Sunday, June 6, 2010

Weekend Quickies - Sunday June 6, 2010 - Odd & Ends

1981 Puma - Back in February, 2009, I wrote about a Puma convertible. These are Brazilian cars based on a VW platform. In Brazil these were sold as complete cars. A few made their way into the US in semi-kit form. The "kit" was actually a complete car. All the buyer had to do was install the front suspension, transaxle, engine, wheels, and tires.

I'll end this with the same sentence I ended my original post with... "There are very few cars that are this rare, this beautiful, and are this easy to maintain. Yes, you'll forever be explaining that this is not a kit car, but having a car that is this nice looking with easy parts availability will make it all worthwhile."

Located in W. Fort Worth, TX, click here to see the Craigslist ad.
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Last week I wrote about a Skoda 1202 Combi that had two doors on one side and one on the other. In the post I wrote, "I can't recall any other car from the 1960s that was built this way." I still haven't found another car built like that, but there were some trucks...

These aren't from the sixties and they're not cars, but I'd never seen either and thought they were pretty cool...

My friend Tony pointed out this one...

This is a 1972 Chevy Suburban.



"Longrooffan" pointed out this old Ford truck and has it posted on his blog, "Forposting"

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Yesterday I posted a 1962 Corvair Wagon. A number of people sent me e-mails saying that it looks like a 1961, which would mean that it's not a "true" Monza Wagon (which was only available in 1962). The 1962 had a split bar across the front. Below is a scan of a 1962 Corvair brochure...

It could be a 1961 or it could be a 1962 with a '61 emblem. On a car that has been customized like this one, I'm not sure that it makes much of a difference. You're not really buying this car because it's a Monza wagon, you're buying it for the work that's been done to it. (At least that's my opinion.)

The price, $25,900.00, was thought by most people to be "insane". Since the seller states that he's open to offers, I doubt it will go for that price. In retrospect, my sentence "I suspect this one will go for top dollar", was confusing. I really don't believe this car will sell for the asking price. Still, if it sells, it will most likely sell to someone looking for a custom car like this and will most likely fetch a premium price. (Again, that's just my opinion.)

The brochure scan above comes from a website called "The Old Car Manual Project". I just stumbled across it and it's a really fun site to prowl around. It's features tons of scans of old car brochures and manuals. You can find it here.
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I received this e-mail the other night from JaCG reader, Aris. I was given permissions to post it here...

"On a warm summer night, with the top down and the radio off, driving an Alfa Spider on a long, twisting mountain road isn't close to nirvana, it is nirvana."

And this, is precisely why I'm looking into buying an Alfa Spider. I just found your blog today, and after reading across some of your entries, it seems you are not only a "car guy", but a bit of an "alfista". I enjoyed reading your entries about the Milano, the 164, etc etc.

My Dad owns a 1979 Alfetta GT Mille Miglia edition, and that is the car that got me interested in cars. After about 5 years of not having it running, he finally took it to get fixed up (re-do the Spica injection, etc). It's funny, because I grew up around Ferrari's - my Uncle has a '69 365GT 2+2 and ran a Ferrari Concours show for 25 years+. I grew up practically breathing on F40s, F50s, etc... but for me, the soul of an Alfa Romeo was different, and more enticing. The badge provides a "modest" and "unique" charisma with the car. Almost any Average Joe can recognize a prancing horse on a Ferrari, but to be familiar with the serpent on an Alfa - well, that takes a little bit more due diligence.

Now, on with my story. My father also recently bought a 1981 Ferrari Mondial - it was totally on the cuff. He saw it and picked it up - and is ecstatic being the owner. It's a beautiful car - cranberry in color with matching Cromodoro wheels. Now, on to my problem. My father now has a Ferrari and an Alfa in the garage. He doesn't like the idea of letting me take them out on the road by myself. Granted, I don't feel comfortable taking them out alone, either. My Dad has a sign in the garage that says "You toucha my car, I breaka your face.". You get the picture.

My 25th birthday is coming up on June 11th. I've been looking to purchase a Series 3 Spider for 4 years now. Finally, I have some money saved up for one. My only requirements are that it has a black exterior - and that it isn't a Graduate. I've seen so many Quads and Veloces that they are all starting to blur. I found one in Southern Maryland on Craigslist that looks to be very well sorted out, but the asking price is too high. Do you have any advice? Should I lay the extra $ into one that's in good shape? I read that you owned a few spiders in your past, and was hoping you might have some opinion on what to look for in a good example."

We exchanged a few e-mails and I gave him the best advice I could.(I also sent the e-mail to my friend Jeff, who gave him tons of advice.)

Anyone else have any advice for him? Anyone know of a black Spider for sale in the Northeast? If so, send me an e-mail and I'll forward it to him.

1 comment:

afa said...

Thanks very much for posting this! Much appreciated...

AK