Saturday, October 19, 2013

Weekend Quickies, October 19, 2013

1963 Corvair Van (aka Corvan, Corvair 95) - Other than it being a Corvair (I'm a huge Corvair fan), I have no idea why I'm attracted to this van. But, if I had the extra cash and space, I'd buy it in a heartbeat.

The Corvair 95 (named for its 95 inch wheelbase) was built from 1961 until 1965. It was available as 2 different van styles and 2 different pickup truck styles.

According to the seller, this Corvan has 25,000 miles on it and no rust.

Located in Langhorne, PA, click here to see the Craigslist ad.

1958 Simca Vedette - Yes, this is a European V8 sedan. It looks pretty American, doesn't it? There's a good reason for that...

In the 1950s Simca was looking to expand its manufacturing capabilities. Ford was looking to sell its Poissy, France, plant. A deal was struck, and Simca bought not only the factory, but the rights to Ford's large Vedette sedan.

Since it was designed by Ford, it had a distinctly US look to it. The engine is a 2.4 liter Ford flathead V8.

I have never seen one of these cars in the flesh. This one is in pretty good condition for a car that has been ignored for 32 years. The odometer reads 8100 miles and the seller believes that's the correct mileage. (Not that it really matters as the car will need a complete restoration.)

I really hope the buyer of this car restores it to its original specs and doesn't hot rod it out. While this is not an especially valuable car, it is rare and it would be great to see it as it was when it left the showroom.

Located in Rathdrum, Idaho, click here to see the eBay listing.

1985 Mercedes 500 SEC - Speaking of European V8s... This is a gray market example of Mercedes' big V8 coupe.

This is an Autobahn cruiser, not a nimble sports car. This car would be on my short list of old cars I'd like to drive across the country.

The asking price is $5900.00, which is a bargain for what you're getting. However, while old Mercedes are very well built and fairly reliable, when something does break it is usually very expensive to repair.

Located in Hadley, MA, click here to see the Craigslist ad.

4 comments:

steve in podunk said...

The engine is on the wrong end but I don't think Scooby and the gang would mind that Corvan doing duty as the Mystery Machine.

wal said...

The Van is out-a-sight, boss, right-on, groovy and righteous brother!
It must have lived in a factory to be in rust free condition, if from Penna.
Love ya brother!

Matt Cotton said...

This Vedette was introduced at the Paris Salon in the fall of 1954 and was an instant hit! It was a giant leap forward from the sad, old Vedette and was France's only mainstream V8 family car. The old flathead V8-60 now produced 80 horsepower, providing more than adequate performance and decent economy. It was designed and tested quickly and in total secrecy, mostly at nighttime in Europe's most modern plant at Poissy. (Eventually all Simca production moved here and it is still one of Peugeot's major factory's). Only the future Citroen DS threatened its success and the restyled Vedette Presidentielle carried Charles DeGaule and many foreign heads of state for years through the boulevards of Paris. After the Suez oil crisis, Simca changed their focus to popular economy cars, but Vedette tooling and production moved to Brazil through the 1960s. Imagine, at one point, journalists questioned, "why do Chrysler need the Valiant when they have the Vedette?"

Matt Cotton said...

This Vedette was introduced at the Paris Salon in the fall of 1954 and was an instant hit! It was a giant leap forward from the sad, old Vedette and was France's only mainstream V8 family car. The old flathead V8-60 now produced 80 horsepower, providing more than adequate performance and decent economy. It was designed and tested quickly and in total secrecy, mostly at nighttime in Europe's most modern plant at Poissy. (Eventually all Simca production moved here and it is still one of Peugeot's major factory's). Only the future Citroen DS threatened its success and the restyled Vedette Presidentielle carried Charles DeGaule and many foreign heads of state for years through the boulevards of Paris. After the Suez oil crisis, Simca changed their focus to popular economy cars, but Vedette tooling and production moved to Brazil through the 1960s. Imagine, at one point, journalists questioned, "why do Chrysler need the Valiant when they have the Vedette?"